How to make your own soy ‘yogurt’!!

Yogurt rules in terms of probiotic supplementation, what with all its lactobacilluses and those cool little bifido dudes!

But soy yogurt usually costs an arm and a leg!

Now I have refined a low-cost method for reproducing (literally!) soy yogurt! And, as the bacteria like to live at body temperature, we dispense with the usually complex attempts to maintain that temperature for the culture by using a rice cooker!

Yogurt is essentially just the end product of fermentation of some milky liquid by friendly microbes. Kimchi is to cabbage what yogurt is to ‘milk’.

So what we want is for friendly bacteria to overgrow our chosen milk-stuff, and away we go!

The Materials:

A tub of store-bought soy yogurt with ‘live cultures’ (this is pretty much every store-bought yogurt!)

Some soymilk (I am yet to have as much success with thinner ‘milks’ like rice milk, but I bet Almond milk works a charm!)

Sugar to taste

A clean container and spoon (cleaned just now with hot water and detergent, then rinsed with hot water)

A rice cooker, a surface emanating heat, or a hot day.

Time

The Method:

Mix the store-bought soy yogurt and the soy milk in a ratio stronger than 1:3 (I found mixing them 50:50 works pretty well, and quickly too!). Add sugar to taste.

Put it into the rice cooker, and immerse it in warm/hot water. Set the rice cooker on the ‘warm’ setting, and leave it for a few hours.

Check for solidification. When solidified somewhat, you have made your yogurt! The mix should taste a little sour.

Then add whatever flavours you want: vanilla, strawberries, etc.

Next time you want to make some yogurt, use the batch you just made as the seed (just as you used the store-bought yogurt here). How does it feel to be free of the over-priced yogurt from the store? Ain’t nobody gonna impose their flayvahs on you now!!

Some notes:

Soy yogurt will never be anything like as thick as dairy yogurt unless you add some agar to the soymilk before all of this.

Everybody is very worried when making fermented food. They all think that evil microbes will overrun everything and kill us all in a heinous death of food poisoning. When you think about it, you add 700 gazillion ‘good’ bacteria to your yogurt mix, and then incubate it for a few-several hours. How are any ‘evil’ bacteria going to arise from your pretty-darn-clean containers etc in that time in such numbers as to hurt you?

Enjoy!!

M

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~ by maoctopus on April 26, 2011.

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